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calmPsychotherapy is not easily described in general statements. It varies depending on the personality of both the therapist and the client and the particular problems the client brings. Psychotherapy is not like a medical doctor visit. Instead, it calls for a very active effort on your part. In order for the therapy to be most successful, you will have to work on things we talk about both during our sessions and at home.

We might meet one time and get the job done (it happens), or we may decide together to meet on a schedule (usually weekly, or once or twice a month). In any case, we will decide together how to proceed and how we will know when we re done.

One of the things I will not do is bring along the typical expectations of your family and friends. Love you though they may, they have needs of their own and these color the way they listen and respond to you.  I try to limit my needs to having you show up, ready to talk. Simple. But not always easy.

I will assume that you are already the best authority on your own life, even if things get confusing or complicated sometimes. In couples counseling, I will try to be a neutral observer and helper, without taking sides.

Psychotherapy can have benefits and risks. Discussing unpleasant aspects of your life may make you feel uncomfortable and bring feelings such as sadness, guilt, anger, frustration, loneliness, and helplessness. On the other hand, psychotherapy also offers benefits. Therapy often leads to better relationships, solutions to specific problems, less distress, and better tools for managing your life.

Psychotherapy can work well when combined with other methods, such as exercise, meditation, or medication. I will work with your other providers toward a comprehensive solution. Although I am no longer in practice as a lawyer, I tend to understand and communicate well with lawyers if that happens to be part of the context.


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